UC Davis Health Clinical Studies

A Long-Term Safety and Tolerability Study of Experimental Givinostat in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Volunteer for research at UC Davis and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!

This study will test the long-term safety and effectiveness of the experimental medicine Givinostat. It will be given to patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). This long-term study is for patients who have already participated in a study with Givinostat. It provides the opportunity for them to continue treatment. This study is for patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy currently taking experimental Givinostat.

Drug study, Phase [2, 3]
Male, age 7 years or older

A Study of Experimental Blood Derived Autologous Angiogenic Cell Precursor (type of stem cell) Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Volunteer for research at UC Davis and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a common, progressive circulatory disease. It sometimes advances to Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI). CLI symptoms can be painful and lead to sores and in some cases amputation. This study will test the safety and effectiveness of injecting Angiogenic Cell Precursors (ACPs) into the muscles of your leg and foot. ACPs are specific stem cells collected from your blood. This experimental study treatment will be used to relieve symptoms of Critical Limb Ischemia.

Biological study, Phase 2
Any, age 18 years or older

A Study of Experimental PLX PAD for Critical Limb Ischemia (severely obstructed arteries limiting bloodflow to limbs)

Volunteer for research at UC Davis and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!

This study will test if experimental PLX-PAD is safe, well tolerated and effective for the treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI). This study is for people with CLI, who are not considered good candidates for surgery or other procedures designed to increase blood flow. CLI is a severe form of peripheral artery disease (PAD). It is caused by atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries due to plaques in their inner walls). When the blood vessels that supply blood to the leg narrow, this leads to insufficient blood and oxygen supply to the leg tissues. CLI may be characterized by pain in the foot or leg even when lying at rest. It can also involve foot and leg wounds, which sometimes lead to infection and tissue death. This may lead to the amputation of toes, foot or leg. PLX-PAD is an experimental medicine. This means that it is not approved for use by the FDA, other than in research studies. PLX-PAD is a cellular therapy, meaning that it contains living cells which are injected into the patient’s muscles. These cells come from a human placenta (the organ that connects the fetus to the uterus). It is collected in a sterile procedure during a planned cesarean section, from healthy female volunteers who donated it. All placenta donors complete a comprehensive questionnaire on their risk of being infected or being a carrier of infectious diseases. Their blood is tested for a vast panel of infectious diseases. Since this research uses human cells, the process for obtaining the cells and preparing them for use is subject to the highest standards. PLX-PAD cells are added to a fluid which contains: - dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), - human serum albumin (human blood protein) - PlasmaLyte (salts solution). The control solution contains: - dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), - human serum albumin (human blood protein) - PlasmaLyte (salts solution) The control solution does not contain the PLX-PAD cells and is not expected to make your disease better.

Biological study, Phase 3
Any, age 45 to 99 years old

A Study of the Experimental Neuro-Spinal Scaffold™ Device for Complete Thoracic AIS A Spinal Cord Injury

Volunteer for research at UC Davis and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!

The purpose of this study is to test the safety and benefit of a new medical device. This device is implanted into the injured spinal cord for a recent spinal cord injury. The procedure to implant the medical device may be added to the usual, standard treatment for spinal cord injury. The study doctor will attempt to perform your surgery as soon as possible. The medical device is experimental and is not approved by the FDA. There is no evidence that the medical device will be of any benefit to you. However, the study will look at whether the new medical device helps improve the medical condition of patients with recent spinal cord injuries.

Device study
Any, age 16 to 70 years old

A Randomized Trial Comparing Monocryl(absorbable) vs. Nylon (traditional) Suture Closure in Carpal Tunnel Surgery

Volunteer for research at UC Davis and contribute to discoveries that may improve health care for you, your family, and your community!

This research study hopes to determine if there is a significant difference in using two different types of sutures (stitches): - subcuticular (under the skin) Monocryl (absorbable) vs - traditional Nylon sutures (stitches) These sutures will be used after open carpal tunnel decompression surgery. Both types of suture are commonly used in clinical practice. There is no objective data about which is “better”.

Procedure study
Any, age 18 years or older
Loading