UC Davis Health Clinical Studies

A Study of the Experimental Medicine Olaparib For Advanced Glioma, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Solid Tumors With IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations

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You are being asked to take part in this study because you have a tumor with an abnormal gene called IDH1 or IDH2. Your tumor may have grown or has recurred. There is no standard FDA approved treatment that is specific for people with this kind of abnormality in the tumor. People who are not in a study are usually treated with standard chemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapies, surgery or radiation. These treatments may reduce your symptoms and slow down the growth of your tumor, but they are not curative. The purpose of this study is to test any good and bad effects of a drug called Olaparib. Researchers showed in the laboratory that Olaparib can shrink tumors like yours or stop its growth. Olaparib has already been FDAapproved to treat other cancers that have similar abnormalities. Researchers hope to learn if the study drug will shrink the cancer by at least one-quarter compared to its present size. Olaparib could shrink your cancer but it could also cause side effects. There will be about 145 people taking part in this study.

Other study, Phase 2
Any, age 18 years or older

A Study of Observation or Radiation Therapy For Grade II Meningioma (non-cancerous brain tumor) That Has Been Completely Removed

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This study will compare the effects of using radiation to treat a meningioma that has been completely removed. Meningioma is a non-cancerous tumor on the brain and/or spinal cord. This radiation treatment will be compared to the usual approach of observing the tumor and treating it with radiation if it returns. Using radiation before the tumor returns could prevent it from returning but it could also cause side effects. This study will allow researchers to learn whether radiation treatment is better, the same, or worse than observation after surgery.

Other study
Any, age 18 years or older

Learn about a study of emergency care in patients with traumatic brain injury.

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BOOST3 is a research study to learn if either of two strategies for monitoring and treating patients with TBI in the intensive care unit (ICU) is more likely to help them get better. Both of these alternative strategies are used in standard care. It is unknown if one is more effective than the other. In one strategy doctors concentrate only on preventing high ICP (intracranial pressure) caused by a swollen brain. In the other strategy doctors try to prevent high ICP, and also try to prevent low PbtO2 (brain oxygen). It is unknown if measuring and treating low brain oxygen is more effective, less effective, or the same as monitoring and treating high brain pressure alone. The results of this study will help doctors discover if one of these methods is more safe and effective.

Interventional
Any, age 14 and older

A Study of the Effects of Brain Stimulation on Higher-Order Cognition

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The purpose of this research study is to learn more about how the brain functions during higher-order cognition. “Higher-order cognition” refers to processes like language comprehension and reasoning. Specifically we hope to learn whether stimulating an area of the brain called the prefrontal cortex can improve these processes. We are doing this research because understanding how the brain functions during these processes, including how it responds to stimulation, will provide important new scientific information relevant to mental health disorders including schizophrenia, and could eventually lead to the development of new treatments.

Device study
Any, age 18 to 35 years old

A Study of Reduced Therapy for Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed WNT-Driven Medulloblastoma

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You are being asked to take part in this research study because you have been diagnosed with a cancer called medulloblastoma. This is a type of childhood brain tumor. This cancer is called “average-risk” or “Classic Medulloblastoma” because: - you are 3 years of age or older - the tumor is in the very back of the brain in an area called the posterior fossa - all or almost all of the tumor was removed by surgery - the cancer has not spread to other parts of your brain or spinal cord. The term, risk, refers to the chance of the cancer coming back after treatment. There are four main types of Medulloblastoma. They are set apart by the presence, absence, or changing levels of certain proteins and other molecules in the tumor cells. Some of these different types of cancer respond differently to current treatments. This study if for patients whose doctors think they have Classic Medulloblastoma of the WNT sub-type type. WNT-subtype medulloblastoma patients have had better survival than other types of medulloblastoma. WNT-subtype medulloblastoma can be found using a number of specialized molecular tests. People with WNT-subtype medulloblastoma will get less therapy than other types of medulloblastoma. So, we want to make sure that the diagnosis is correct before you are given any treatment on this research study. It is unknown whether less treatment will result in no change in the chance of cure or a decreased chance of a cure.

Drug study, Phase 2
Any, age 3 to 21 years old
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