UC Davis Veterinary Clinical Trials

VACCS: Vaccination Against Canine Cancer Study

Help us prevent cancer in dogs with a new vaccine!

Cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs, accounting for approximately 30% of all deaths. Certain breeds have much higher likelihoods of cancer than others. “Tumor antigens” are proteins that can be recognized by the immune system as foreign and result in the attack of tumors by the immune system. Researchers have identified a series of new tumor antigens that appear to be produced in multiple types of cancer very early in tumor development and are produced in cancers from many species (humans, dogs and mice). Vaccination of mice with these antigens can delay or prevent multiple types of cancer without side effects. The purpose of this study is to determine whether vaccination with these novel tumor antigens is capable of reducing the likelihood of cancer in dogs.

Preventative vaccine study

Novel Treatment for Nasal Tumors

Help us treat nasal tumors in dogs using a new kind of therapy!

Nasal tumors can cause severe nasal bleeding or discharge and difficulty breathing. These tumors often aggressively spread throughout the tissues of the nasal cavity and into the surrounding organs, including the eye and brain. Radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for nasal tumors in dogs; however, radiation therapy isn't often good for long-term control of the tumor. An another treatment option is transarterial embolization, or TAE, which involves the delivery of a mechanical “clot” to the main arteries supplying blood to the tissues of the nasal cavity with the goal of eliminating the blood supply of the tumor and decreasing tumor size. The purposes of this study are to 1) describe TAE in dogs with naturally-occurring nasal cancer, 2) evaluate the effect that nasal TAE has on the tumor, and 3) evaluate the effect that nasal TAE has on the values measured by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning.

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