UC Davis Veterinary Clinical Trials

Finding the genes causing symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy in Bearded collies

Help us find out what genes cause symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy in Bearded collies!

Canine Genetic Disease Project - Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy Purpose: Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy (SLO) is a chronic autoimmune disorder that causes a loss of toenails in many breeds, including Bearded Collies. The age of onset is typically between 3-8 years of age affecting 1-2 nails and eventually progressing to all nails. Scientists believe that heredity may be one of the contributing causes of this disease. The overall purpose of this study is three-fold: * To evaluate the mode of inheritance of canine diseases; * To identify the genes responsible for disease expression; and, * To join the tools of statistics with the promise of molecular genetics.

Genetic Study

Finding the genes causing epilepsy in dogs

Help us find out what genes cause epilepsy in dogs!

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that causes abnormal bursts of electrical activity in the brain (lasting from seconds to minutes). Seizures are characterized by jerking of the limbs, anxiety, salivation, vocalizing, and loss of bodily functions (urination/defecation). Epilepsy can be caused by metabolic disorders, infectious diseases, brain injury, toxins, or brain tumors. A genetic seizure condition in dogs can occur called idiopathic (of unknown cause) or inherited epilepsy. Since a dog with idiopathic epilepsy shows no recognizable abnormalities, it is assumed to be an inherited condition in most breeds and demonstrated to be heritable in some breeds. Treatment of seizures is usually two-fold which includes treatment of the underlying problem (infection, tumor, injury) and reducing or eliminating the seizure episodes with anticonvulsant medication. The overall purpose of this study is three-fold: * To evaluate the mode of inheritance of canine diseases; * To identify the genes responsible for disease expression; and, * To join the tools of statistics with the promise of molecular genetics.

Genetic Study

Finding the genes causing Addison's disease in dogs

Help us find out what genes cause Addison's Disease in dogs!

Addison’s Disease or Hypoadrenocorticism is a deficiency in the secretion of both glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids from the adrenal cortex. The cause is unknown; however, there appears to be an immune mediated destruction of the adrenal gland in most cases. Symptoms include inappetance, vomiting, lethargy and weakness. An ACTH stimulation test to evaluate the ability of the adrenal gland to secrete cortisol can be used for diagnosis. Affected dogs show low cortisol concentrations, and no increase in cortisol following the ACTH test. Treatment for this disease includes fluid therapy, replacement of glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids, and hormone therapy. The overall purpose of this study is three-fold: * To evaluate the mode of inheritance of canine diseases; * To identify the genes responsible for disease expression; and, * To join the tools of statistics with the promise of molecular genetics.

Genetic Study

Understanding the genes behind Aspergillus spp. infections in German Shepherds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks and Hungarian Vizslas

Help us find out what genes cause Aspergillus spp. infections in German Shepherds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks and Vizslas!

Systemic fungal infections such as aspergillosis are rare in animals with a competent immune system; however, certain dog breeds (namely the German shepherd, Rhodesian ridgeback and Hungarian vizsla) are reported to have a higher risk of this uncommon disease. A genetic etiology is suspected to cause this over-representation. We propose to use a technique called genome-wide association analysis to evaluate the differences in the genetic material of affected dogs (dogs infected with Aspergillus spp.).

Genetic Study
Any, age None specified

Understanding the genes behind dry eye syndrome in West Highland white terriers

Help us find out what genes cause dry eye syndrome (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) in westies!

Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) or dry eye is a devastating disease that causes ocular pain and potentially blindness. It is seen more frequently in West Highland White Terriers in comparison to many other breeds. We are interested identifying the genetic components of this disease as well as characterizing this disease better with examination and testing of the tear film and ocular surface and in select patients using advanced imaging techniques.

Other - Genetic Study
Any, age Multiple

Understanding Corneal Endothelial Dystrophy in Boston Terriers, German Shorthaired and Wirehaired Pointers

Help us find out what genes cause corneal endothelial dystrophy in different breeds!

Corneal endothelial dystrophy (CED) is a devastating disease in dogs that can result in blindness and severe ocular pain from secondary complications. The endothelial cells comprise the most inner aspect of the cornea and are responsible for maintaining a proper fluid balance. This function is critical to ensuring that the cornea remains transparent for vision. In many animals, including dogs, corneal endothelial cells have a very limited capacity to regenerate following injury. In canine patients with CED, the endothelial cells degenerate until the cells still remaining can no longer function properly. This results in swelling of the cornea (edema) which results in decreased vision as well as formation of small fluid-filled blisters (bullae) on the cornea which can rupture and cause ocular discomfort. There are palliative treatments such as hypertonic saline to decrease corneal bullae formation but the only definitive treatment for this condition is a corneal transplant (penetrating keratoplasty). Unfortunately, corneal transplants are rarely performed in canine patients with CED due to the expense of the surgery and follow-up care, relatively high risk of complications, and lack of appropriate donor tissue. Several dog breeds, including Boston Terriers, German Shorthaired Pointers and German Wirehaired Pointers, are seen more commonly for CED in comparison to other breeds. This observation suggests that this disease may have a genetic component. A similar condition called Fuch’s endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) exists in humans and several genes associated with FECD have been identified. We propose to identify the region of the dog genome associated with CED in Boston Terriers, German Shorthaired Pointers and German Wirehaired Pointers. In order to do this, we will perform thorough eye examinations and use non-invasive advanced imaging techniques to examine Boston Terriers, German Shorthaired Pointers and German Wirehaired Pointers with CED and age-matched control dogs. We will collect blood from these dogs to obtain DNA. The entire canine genome will be evaluated for an association with CED. This work will be used to identify the gene(s) responsible for this condition in Boston Terriers, German Shorthaired Pointers and German Wirehaired Pointers. The ultimate goal will be to develop a genetic test for CED in Boston Terriers, German Shorthaired Pointers and German Wirehaired Pointers and possibly other breeds, such as Chihuahuas and Dachshunds, with an increased risk of CED.

Genetic Study
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